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2023 Maserati Ghibli Review, Pricing, and Specs

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Overview

With brawny twin-turbo powertrains and swoon-worthy styling, the 2023 Maserati Ghibli is a sports sedan with an overwhelmingly Italian flavor. You won’t find any wimpy four-cylinders here, either. The Ghibli’s entry-level engine is a 345-hp twin-turbo V-6 that can be upgraded to 424 ponies in the mid-range Modena trim. The most ripped model is the twin-turbo V-8 Trofeo, which pumps out a stout 580 horsepower. The Ghibli’s chassis is tuned for fun, with handling that’s sports-car sharp balanced with a refined enough ride to satisfy luxury buyers who might otherwise go for an Audi A6 or a Mercedes-Benz E-class. Unfortunately, that refinement doesn’t carry into the Ghibli’s interior. It features a mix of materials starting with the expected leather, wood, and metal trim. But those richer finishes are intermingled with some cheap plastic pieces and subpar fit-and-finish. Even so, the Ghibli’s exotic look and goosebump-inducing performance are traits worthy of admiration.

What’s New for 2023?

Although the Ghibli receives no significant changes for 2023, its entry price certainly does. The base GT model is now $6100 higher than it was last year. The mid-range Modena’s price rises by $7000 and the top-level Trofeo is up $5900.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

If the Ghibli’s starting price seems high, that’s because it is. Most mid-size luxury sedans start around $55,000 and increase from there. But those rival sedans also have turbocharged four-cylinders for base engines and then graduate to more powerful V-6s as the prices rise. The Ghibli skips the fours and offers a twin-turbo V-6 as standard equipment. We’d suggest the Modena model as it unlocks 424 ponies and covers more of the Ghibli’s interior with genuine leather upholstery.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The base setup for the Ghibli is a 345-hp twin-turbo 3.0-liter V-6 with rear-wheel drive; the Modena model ups the power to 424 horsepower. Going with the range-topping Trofeo model adds a 580-hp twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter V-8 engine. Rear-wheel drive is standard, but all-wheel drive (Q4 in Maserati parlance) is available with the V-6. Both engines have an eight-speed automatic transmission. We tested an S model (replaced by the Modena for 2022) back in 2014 and were charmed by the exotic sounds it made. At our test track, it managed a 4.7-second zero-to-60-mph time—quick for 2014, but today it can be outrun by a non-AMG version of the Mercedes-Benz E-class. Since then, Maserati has upped the power on that version of the V-6 engine to 424 horsepower. When we tested this engine in the Maserati Levante SUV, it managed a time of 5.1 seconds, so the lighter Ghibli should be noticeably quicker. The V-8–powered Trofeo model packs an even mightier wallop, and we estimate it’s capable of a 3.7-second run to 60 mph. The Ghibli’s on-road demeanor is frisky, but it maintains a level of refinement that keeps it in the hunt with some of today’s best luxury sport sedans.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Since the Ghibli lacks a base four-cylinder model, its EPA fuel-economy ratings are thirstier than the average mid-size luxury car. The rear-wheel-drive V-6 models earn ratings of 18 mpg city and 25 mpg highway; going for all-wheel drive drops the city rating to 17 mpg. The V-8–powered Trofeo is rated at 13 mpg city and 20 mpg highway. We haven’t tested the Ghibli on our 75-mph highway fuel-economy route, but plan to update this review when we get a chance to do so. For more information about the Ghibli’s fuel economy, visit the EPA’s website.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

While the exterior exudes Italian style, the cabin isn’t as luxurious as expected. A few of its interior bits are sourced from lesser vehicles within the Stellantis product portfolio. For example, it uses the same window switches as the Jeep Cherokee and light switches and steering-column stalks from the now-defunct Chrysler Town & Country. Buyers can, however, spec the Ghibli with beautifully stitched leather-and-silk seats, a faux-suede headliner, and a wood-rimmed steering wheel. The Ghibli’s trunk is larger than that of the E-class or the A6, but the BMW 5-series offers slightly more space. When a Ghibli visits our office, we’ll see how many carry-on suitcases it can accommodate and update this review with the results.

Infotainment and Connectivity

All Ghibli models come with a 10.1-inch touchscreen infotainment system that features a glossy display and runs a re-skinned version of Google’s Android Automotive interface. Navigation, SiriusXM satellite radio, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are all standard. An eight-speaker audio system is standard, too, but audiophiles will be happy to know that Maserati offers two different premium systems as upgrades. The first is a 10-speaker Harman/Kardon setup, while the second is a 15-speaker Bowers & Wilkins audio system.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The Ghibli is offered with several driver-assistance features; most are standard equipment. For more information about the Ghibli’s crash test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites. Key safety features include:

  • Standard automated emergency braking with pedestrian detection
  • Standard lane-departure warning with lane-keeping assist
  • Standard adaptive cruise control

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Most mid-size luxury cars from Europe offer simple four-year/50,000-mile warranties, and the Ghibli follows suit. It would be nice if Maserati offered a complimentary scheduled maintenance package with the purchase of a new Ghibli, but such a policy has been omitted from the car’s standard package. The 5-series and the Jaguar XF both offer better value in this category.

  • Limited warranty covers four years or 50,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers four years or 50,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance

More Features and Specs

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